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Yes, you can be deported even when you are married to a U.S. citizen!

| Jun 21, 2021 | Immigration

Love has been described as a universal language for one valid reason: men and women have been crossing borders for centuries in search of it. However, contrary to popular belief, marrying a U.S citizen is no guarantee that you can never be kicked out of the country should you get into trouble with the law. Here are some of the offenses that can trigger your deportation from the U.S even if you have a permanent resident status.

  1. If you have been found guilty of an aggravated felony

While an aggravated felony falls under federal law, it can be prosecuted under state laws. This crime ranges from a misdemeanor to a felony. And if you have been convicted of any of them, it will be up to the immigration department to determine whether you should be deported. Some of the crimes deemed aggravated felonies include murder, rape, drug trafficking, treason, and trafficking of firearms among others.

  1. If you have been found in possession of controlled substances

Being in possession of controlled substances can earn you a one-way ticket out of the U.S even if you have earned your permanent residency status. In addition, you could also be barred from entering the U.S in the future. Thus, if you are a drug abuser or a drug addict, the Immigration and Nationality Act stipulates that you can be removed from the U.S.

  1. If you fail to meet the conditions of your permanent residency

Failure to meet the conditions of your permanent residency could result in the denial of your green card. The result: You may be deported. If you hold a two-year conditional permanent residency courtesy of your marriage, you could be deported if it is discovered that the marriage was fraudulent or if the marriage ends before the two years are through.

So, you can be deported even if you are married to a U.S citizen. If you are facing possible deportation for an offense you have been accused of committing, it is important that you speak to an immigration attorney who will assess your case and advice on what you can do about it.